Indonesia’s economy could probably cope with a sudden outflow of ‘hot money’ from its economy but should still be wary of risks presented by such bubbles, said the government.

Bambang Brodjonegoro, The Finance Ministry’s head of fiscal management, said his country should minimize hot money scenarios, or short term investors chasing quick profits on the country’s fast-rising economy. Channeling investments into long-term FDIs (foreign direct investors) and government bonds was preferable to achieve stability and growth.

Foreign investors have become fascinated with so-called ‘emerging’ economies in the past few years as growth opportunities in the developed West have dried up and countries like China, India and Indonesia have boomed. Indonesia’s premier market index, the Jakarta Composite Index (JCI) has risen 6% this year to 4,130.80 and its currency, the rupiah, has increased its value by 5.5% against the US Dollar, to Rp 8,491.

The government may well be getting its wish, as foreign sales of Indonesian government bonds have also risen 31% to Rp 248 trillion (US$29 billion) with 15 year bonds yielding an attractive 9%. The Finance Ministry said foreign investment could reach 40% of all bond holdings after the government sells a further Rp 40 trillion by the end of this year.

Indonesia has suffered in the recent past from rapid foreign capital flight, once during the Asian Crisis of the late 1990s and less severely after the 2008 global financial crisis, which still devalued the rupiah. With the effects of both crises still looming large in memory, fears of hot money and moves to curb short term investments are common across the region.

source & article: The Jakarta Globe